Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People?

ASK BVKS | May 6, 2011 |

English;

Question:

My question is why do bad things happen with good people or innocent people?

Answer by HH Bhakti Vikāśa Swami:

An often asked question. The problem of evil. If God is good, then why do bad things happen to good people?

Well, the answer is that no one is good in this material world. The so-called good person who is suffering, is suffering because of reactions to sinful activities performed in previous lives.

Maybe someone who is bad is getting good luck — lots of money, but that means they did some pious activities in previous lives. Now they’ve got opportunity they are taking advantage and exploiting others. That cycle goes on. The good people are good as a result of their pious activities, they get the opportunity to enjoy this world, and they exploit others and then get sinful reactions, and it goes on like this.

There is an article about this called ’’Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People“ by Ravīndra-svarūpa Prabhu. It was featured in Back to Godhead magazine many years ago. That is accessible from The Bhaktivedanta Vedabase. If you don’t have access to that, you can ask someone. It examines this in detail.

http://www.krishna.com/do-bad-things-happen-good-people

But in the modern age someone may be polite and well behaved, but people are eating meat and watching TV — which is all sinful.

Who is good? What is the meaning of good? We think someone is good because they stroke their pet dog, they look after their pet dog very nicely. Good means to surrender to Kṛṣṇa.

 

 

 

 

 

Audio answer:

Play (2 m 9 s)     Download (614.3 KB)    

You can mark interesting parts of the page content and share unique link from browser address bar.

Mark




Related Lectures

Reading from Sri Bhaktisiddhanta Vaibhava

February 22, 2011 |

English; Baroda, Gujarat, India

Initiation of Saranga Das and Isesvari Devi Dasi

March 12, 2017 |

English with தமிழ் translation; Salem, Tamil Nadu, India

Initiation Lecture

May 5, 2012 |

English; Mayapur, West Bengal, India

Dharmakrt

August 19, 2016 |

English; Inish Rath, Ireland

Definition and Experiences of Bhava-bhakti

April 24, 2012 |

Question: If a karmi sees a picture of Radha Krsna and feels an emotion of joy, admiration, and appreciation of the picture, can this be called bhava-bhakti? If a kanistha devotee who has faith in the supreme position of Krsna feels an emotion of joy love and appreciation when seeing the deities, can this be called bhava-bhakti? Basically… Expand>

Question:

If a karmi sees a picture of Radha Krsna and feels an emotion of joy, admiration, and appreciation of the picture, can this be called bhava-bhakti?

If a kanistha devotee who has faith in the supreme position of Krsna feels an emotion of joy love and appreciation when seeing the deities, can this be called bhava-bhakti?

Basically how can we define bhava-bhakti and can you experience it even when you have a mundane material consciousness?

More importantly how can a devotee transform his bhava-bhakti to suddha-bhakti?

^ Show less

English;

You Can't Learn to Swim Unless You Get in Water

February 16, 2012 |

Question: For a very long time, I have felt very nervous about joining devotees on Harinama or book distribution. Honestly, I feel a bit embarrassed at the thought of my friends seeing me with devotees, or seeing me distributing books or seeing me in a Tilaka etc. I am worried people will think this guy is a nut or… Expand>

Question:

For a very long time, I have felt very nervous about joining devotees on Harinama or book distribution. Honestly, I feel a bit embarrassed at the thought of my friends seeing me with devotees, or seeing me distributing books or seeing me in a Tilaka etc. I am worried people will think this guy is a nut or a fool! I am worried they will judge me and I will lose my so-called social standing.

Right from my childhood, I have been a very shy and lonely person and I am always easily embarrassed. I grew up with severe inferiority complex in my childhood. Both my parents were completely uneducated, not respected, not well off etc. They passed that over to me. That low self esteem has stayed with me. Hence I am very scared and nervous of doing anything public.

Maharaja, I am very much worried that this nature of mine will interfere with my future service to you. How do I fix this issue? I really really want to make progress and I will follow any order you give me here to correct this situation.

^ Show less

English;

December 13, 2004 |

English; Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India

Remember Krsna Everyday

August 20, 2017 |

English; Manipal, Karnataka, India

Jnanagamyam

October 2, 2016 |

English; Salem, Tamil Nadu, India

Nivrtatma, Samakshepta

October 27, 2017 |

English; Vrindavana, Uttar Pradesh, India

  • Viṣṇu-sahasranāma 604-605

  • 57 m 28 s  |  26.3 MB

  • Download
  • Play

Govinda's Restaurant Sells Coffee

May 21, 2011 |

Question: Is It alright for Govinda's restaurant of ISKCON to serve coffee in their menu. Kolkata Govinda's have it in their menu. Why is Gurusaday road premises in Kolkata being rented out for marriage parties who also serve tea coffee to their guests, Is Prabhupada happy with these activities? If not let us stop it.

English;

Visvakarma

June 30, 2012 |

English; Zurich, Switzerland

Further Discussion on Concerns About ISKCON

September 20, 2011 |

English; Valsad, Gujarat, India

Indians, Awake!

February 5, 2015 |

English with తెలుగు translation; Narasapur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Bhaktisiddhanta's Enigmatic Mercy, Part-2

December 29, 2015 |

English; Salem, Tamil Nadu, India

Offences Against The Name of Love

May 24, 2015 |

English with தமிழ் translation; Batticaloa, Sri Lanka

Sannyasa and Sannyasis

September 13, 2004 |

English; Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

  • Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam 1.6.12-13

  • 34 m 10 s  |  15.6 MB

  • Download
  • Play

Sandesh Sweet – Dress for Nrsimhadeva

August 19, 2012 |

Question: My question is regarding deity outfits. On Nrsimha Caturdasi, at an ISKCON temple in Germany, the deity of lord Nrsimhadev was dressed/pasted with different flavours/colours of sandesh milk sweet dough instead of any sort of cloth outfit. Maharaja, my question is that is the above performed act, proper and in line with the scriptural rules of deity… Expand>

Question:

My question is regarding deity outfits. On Nrsimha Caturdasi, at an ISKCON temple in Germany, the deity of lord Nrsimhadev was dressed/pasted with different flavours/colours of sandesh milk sweet dough instead of any sort of cloth outfit. 

Maharaja, my question is that is the above performed act, proper and in line with the scriptural rules of deity worship, just as during chandan yatra the deities are pasted with sandalwood paste or just as there are flower outfits for the deities in many temples? Or is it not to be accepted. I mean something similar to the previous incident of the deities dressed in Santa Claus outfits?

ANSWER by HH Bhakti Vikāśa Swami: 

I’m not aware of any scriptural rule that says to dress the Deities in a dress made of milk sweets. It’s the first time I ever heard about it. There are various aspects of Vaiṣṇava culture which may not be directly described in śāstra, but they may be performed in some places as a tradition. So, may be that in some traditional temple in India that there is a tradition on certain days dressing the Deities like that; although, at least in India, if you were to do so, then quite likely the Deity would be covered with ants very quickly. So, that may not be a very good idea to do that. Ants and flies would come. Probably not so much in Germany because there are not so many little living entities as there are in India. But there are some very desirable elements of Vaishnava culture which could, according to the discrimination of the devotees – that may be questionable also (the level of discrimination as to what should be accepted and what should not be accepted). But there are various items of Vaiṣṇava culture which can be adopted, but if something is not in śāstra, is not in tradition… I’d be very cautious about making innovations, especially in Deity worship. So, you probably have to ask the devotees in Germany where they got this idea from. One consideration is that it’s fairly common in India to see Deities of Hanuman covered with butter. That’s quite a common practice. I don’t know if the Deities get attacked by ants, or whatever. Flies come. I’ve seen that. It’s quite often done.

^ Show less

English;

Hopefullness and Eagerness

January 20, 2011 |

English; Porbandar, Gujarat, India

  • Śrī Caitanya-caritāmṛta 2.23.18-19

  • 35 m 51 s  |  8.2 MB

  • Download
  • Play