Why Bhakti Is Independent of Other Forms of Yoga

ASK BVKS | August 2, 2011 |

English;

Question:

Did Prabhupada name his version of the Gita, As it is to give a sub meaning to tat tvam asi-that thou art, and aham brahmasmi. Why is it that bhakti can be attained without necessarily taking part in other forms of yoga? Narada Muni explains in the bhakti sutras that bhakti is the fruit of all yoga paths. My real question is Where is the tree or vine in relation to this metaphor?

Audio answer:

Play (6 m 12 s)     Download (1.4 MB)    

You can mark interesting parts of the page content and share unique link from browser address bar.

Mark




Related Lectures

The Guru of the Demons

November 18, 2014 |

English; Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

The Attractiveness of Srila Prabhupada, Part-1

August 18, 2014 |

English; Govindadvipa, Ireland

Everything is in My Books

July 12, 2011 |

Question: We hear that Srila Prabhupada's books contain everything that we need to know. How does this apply to 11th and 12th Cantos, that are part of Prabhupada's Bhagavatam, but not directly translated and commentated upon by him?

English;

Perfection of Religion, Part-4

February 7, 2015 |

English; Bhimavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India

Lokadhyaksa, Suradhyaksa, Dharmadhyaksa

September 3, 2012 |

English; Denver, Colorado, USA

Shall I Go to Doctor or Demigod?

May 6, 2011 |

Question: Recently one congregation devotee asked me "I am having some material problem for a long time and my father suggested/forced me to show to an astrologer who suggested me to worship some demigod and my problems will be solved. He gave 100% guarantee. This will cost Rs.35,000 but if result is not there he… Expand>

Question:

Recently one congregation devotee asked me "I am having some material problem for a long time and my father suggested/forced me to show to an astrologer who suggested me to worship some demigod and my problems will be solved. He gave 100% guarantee. This will cost Rs.35,000 but if result is not there he will return all money". So his father is forcing him but he doesn't want to take shelter of someone else than Krsna. But he asked me "when a devotee becomes sick he also goes to see doctor which is like taking shelter of a demigod for curing some material problem. So why this is allowed while demigod worship for solving material problems is not? What is the difference? In Ayurveda also worship of demigods is sometimes recommended to cure some disease. It seems logical that we worship demigods to solve material problems that are posing hindrance in our service to Krsna".

So I request Your Holiness to reveal answer to this.

^ Show less

English;

Don't Neglect Rules and Regulations

January 16, 2014 |

English; Salem, Tamil Nadu, India

  • Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam 5.8.11-12

  • 58 m 10 s  |  26.6 MB

  • Download
  • Play

Unholiness in the Dhama

February 2, 2014 |

English; Rajapur, West Bengal, India

  • Śrī Caitanya-caritāmṛta 2.16.281

  • 39 m 35 s  |  18.1 MB

  • Download
  • Play

Beyond birth and death

October 2, 2015 |

English;

Categories of Krsna-katha, Part-2

April 16, 2016 |

English; Srirangam, Tamil Nadu, India

Devotees or Demons

July 20, 2017 |

English; Gauragrama, Telangana, India

The Principle of Charity

May 14, 2014 |

English; London, England

The Goddess Principle

April 16, 2016 |

English; Srirangam, Tamil Nadu, India

Pramodanah, Anandah, Nandanah, Nandah

January 10, 2017 |

English; Kutralam, Tamil Nadu, India

  • Viṣṇu-sahasranāma 528-531

  • 37 m 51 s  |  17.3 MB

  • Download
  • Play

What to Learn from Narendra Modi

November 11, 2014 |

English; Vellore,Tamil Nadu, India

The Quality of Forgiveness

July 21, 2014 |

English with Русский translation; Dobromysh, Tatarstan, Russia

Right Philosophy, Wrong Application

January 14, 2014 |

English; Salem, Tamil Nadu, India

Gurus, Disciples, and Cultural Considerations

September 27, 2015 |

English; Dallas, Texas, USA

Regarding Child Abuse

August 27, 2016 |

English with Český translation; Brno, Czech Republic

All Glories to Lord Guruvayurappan

May 14, 2011 |

English; Guruvayur, Kerala, India