Democracy, quasi-kings, and corruption

    Posted on June 11, 2017



Русский перевод

In a monarchy, one man sufficiently trained was competent enough to conduct alone the business of the state. But in a democracy no one is trained like a prince; instead, politicians are voted to responsible posts of administration by diplomatic arrangements. In place of one king or supreme executive officer, in a democracy there are so many quasi-kings: the president, the ministers, the deputy ministers, the secretaries, the assistant secretaries, the private secretaries, and the undersecretaries. There are a number of parties — political, social, and communal — and there are party whips, party whims, and so on. But no one is well enough trained to look after the factual interests of the governed. In a so-called democratic government, corruption is even more rampant than in an autocracy or monarchy.

Light of the Bhagavat verse 44

 

See also:

If an ant kisses the lotus feet of Krsna
India's glory
Pickpockets and a bogus yogi
Not the ornamentation, but the ecstasy
Benefits of attending Ratha-yatra
Bhaktivinoda Thakura says that you are an ass
The path of darkness
The test
For World Yoga Day (21 June) — the highest yoga
Is it good to eat much prasada?
Cows save children and the diseased
Corrupt governments fail to protect citizens
Why we say, "Go back to home, back to Godhead"
Srila Prabhupada's fervent appeal
Eat the guru
 

You can mark interesting parts of the page content and share unique link from browser address bar.

Mark